QUEEN ELIZABETH AIRCRAFT CARRIERS

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH AND HMS PRINCE OF WALES

THE NATION'S FLAGSHIPS

THE NATION'S FLAGSHIPS

They are the biggest warships ever built for the Royal Navy - four acres of sovereign territory, deployable across the globe to serve the United Kingdom on operations for 50 years.

HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales will be the most advanced warships in the Royal Navy fleet.  

While work continues to bring HMS Prince of Wales to life at Rosyth, HMS Queen Elizabeth has been undergoing sea trials since leaving the Scottish dockyard in June and entered her new home in Portsmouth for the first time in August.

All parts of the Armed Forces, international partners and British businesses across the country are involved in building the nation's future flagships.

 

WHAT'S HAPPENING NOW

The Big Arrival

KEEP UP WITH EACH SHIP

Take a closer look at the activities of both these mighty warships

HMS Queen Elizabeth

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH

Undergoing her sea trails, HMS Queen Elizabeth is the first of the UK's new class of aircraft carrier.

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HMS Prince of Wales

HMS PRINCE OF WALES

Under construction at Rosyth, HMS Prince of Wales is the second of the two aircraft carriers.

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Life on Board

THE ROYAL NAVY'S BIGGEST SHIP

QEC not only firmly confirms us as a leading international power, it also gives us the potential to provide a world class environment for our most fearsome weapons

WE MADE THIS SHIP

Iconic projects aren’t always immediately appreciated. The Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, Sydney Opera House. Like HMS Queen Elizabeth, they’ve all had to overcome scrutiny and scepticism. And like HMS Queen Elizabeth, the vision behind them was an ambitious one.

What does it take to create the largest British warship ever built? Equipment and manpower on an undisputed scale.

Like the special crane, 68 metres tall and 120 metres across, that was commissioned just for this project. Or the six UK shipyards involved, not just one – because no single yard was large enough to build the ship in its entirety. And over 250,000km of electrical cable and 8,000km of fibre optic cable.

There are 3,000 people in Rosyth, with another 8,000 people working at sites around the country. Then there’s the wider supply chain network, involving hundreds of companies around the UK. In short, the jobs created and the effort going into this new British built icon are unprecedented for a single project in the 21st century.

It’s a testament to the capability of UK manufacturing – proving that remarkable engineering feats run in Britain’s blood.